Blog

Homeward


We know that homelessness is a complex issue requiring comprehensive solutions and cross-sector partnerships. The circumstances and challenges facing our neighbors experiencing homelessness can vary considerably, so there is no one-size-fits-all approach for individuals and families to regain housing stability. We also know that homelessness is a crisis, and that we as a crisis response system must be equipped to take prompt action. With much on the line, we continue to collaboratively improve the way we respond to homelessness in a coordinated a systematic way. We are committed to continue this important and urgent work until we get to a place where homelessness is rare, brief, and nonrecurring.

Our success as a system is illustrated through a variety of indicators, but the clearest is the year-over-year reduction in homelessness our region has seen since 2009 (28.9% total across this period). These reductions are not a fluke, and reflect top-tier programs facilitated by our service providers as well as our region’s practice of coming together to collaboratively try new approaches to maximize our resources and meet the needs of those experiencing homelessness. A great example of a transformative system improvement serving an unmet need is the implementation of rapid rehousing in 2009. This work began with an investment from The Community Foundation to pilot a program housing 24 families (28 adults and 46 children). Following this pilot, we have seen only one of these families re-enter or homeless services system to-date. Rapid rehousing has shown us that we can do things differently, and we must if we are serious about targeting our hardest to serve and moving ever closer to ending homelessness.

Again, rapid rehousing is not a magic program in and of itself, but it makes sense among the array of housing options available in our community. We know that not everybody facing a housing crisis requires intensive supports to stabilize in housing. People are resilient, and many individuals and families only need light support to get back on their feet and secure the mainstream resources necessary to be successful in housing. Rapid rehousing may not solve every issue faced by a household experiencing homelessness, but we should not mistake this as evidence that rapid rehousing is not working to end homelessness. Self-sufficiency takes time, but we know stable housing can be the springboard our neighbors need to rebuild their lives. We should be proud that our programs are 93% successful in keeping clients housed for at least a year following program exit, and continue to build bridges with the affordable housing and employment resources needed to further broaden this success.

In 2014, we were able to connect 832 children and adults (not including those served by programs for survivors of domestic and sexual abuse) with permanent housing through low-cost rapid rehousing programs. This is substantial, and there remain opportunities to serve even more. For example, in the winter of 2014-215, our region utilized rapid rehousing to move 50 individuals staying in cold weather shelter into permanent housing. Prior to this work, almost all individuals using this shelter exited back into homelessness. We knew we could and needed to do better, and we were able to successfully use rapid rehousing to address this gap in community services.

Rapid rehousing will not end homelessness on its own, though we have seen in Greater Richmond the tremendous impact it can have for families and veterans experiencing homelessness. Our numbers for these populations continue to decline (11.7% reduction in veteran homelessness and 18.5% for family homelessness between 2014 and 2015), and as a community we are rapidly accelerating the pace of change in ending homelessness. From our success comes additional opportunities to find ways to expand this and other successful housing interventions to serve other sub-populations of individuals experiencing homelessness. We must continue to try things differently and get creative in addressing the ongoing challenges of our work, as people’s lives and livelihoods are on the line. To learn more about rapid rehousing click here.

 

PRESS RELEASE

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

June 3, 2015

Homeward Recognizes Homeless Service Providers for Progress in Ending Homelessness in Greater Richmond

Homeward, a collective impact agency working to end homelessness in Greater Richmond, will host its ninth annual Regional Best Practices Conference to Prevent and End Homelessness on Friday, June 5th, 2015 at the Capital One Town Center located on 15000 Capital One Drive, Richmond, VA 23238. The conference will emphasize innovative practices and collaborative partnerships that have fueled year over year reductions in regional homelessness since 2009. The Trends and Innovations Luncheon during the conference will recognize individuals and organizations who are going above and beyond to transition our most vulnerable neighbors into permanent housing.

2015 Award Winners Include:

- Steve Neathery Overcoming Homelessness Award: Jimmy Fenner, HomeAgain

- Randall Hicks Excellence in Homeless Services Award: Georgi Fisher, Virginia Supportive Housing

- Zero: 2016 Leadership Award: Celie Weaver, Virginia Supportive Housing

- Innovation in Homeless Services: Greater Richmond Regional Domestic Violence Hotline

- Community Champion Award: Darcy Oman, The Community Foundation

Norm Suchar, Director of HUD’s Office of Special Needs Assistance Programs, will be keynoting the 2015 conference and will highlight strategic initiatives ending homelessness in communities across the country. Conference themes include building partnerships between workforce development and homeless services, developing standardized processes to more quickly and effectively respond to immediate housing crises, and securing affordable housing resources.

Homeward, a 501(c)3 collective impact nonprofit founded in 1998, works to end homelessness through data collection and trend analysis, building and sustaining collaborative partnerships, and building the capacity of our regional homeless service system to effectively serve clients so that homelessness becomes rare, brief, and non-recurring in our community. To learn more about Homeward visit www.homewardva.org.



PRESS RELEASE

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

June 3, 2015

Homeward Recognizes Homeless Service Providers for Progress in Ending Homelessness in Greater Richmond

Homeward, a collective impact agency working to end homelessness in Greater Richmond, will host its ninth annual Regional Best Practices Conference to Prevent and End Homelessness on Friday, June 5th, 2015 at the Capital One Town Center located on 15000 Capital One Drive, Richmond, VA 23238. The conference will emphasize innovative practices and collaborative partnerships that have fueled year over year reductions in regional homelessness since 2009. The Trends and Innovations Luncheon during the conference will recognize individuals and organizations who are going above and beyond to transition our most vulnerable neighbors into permanent housing.

2015 Award Winners Include:

- Steve Neathery Overcoming Homelessness Award: Jimmy Fenner, HomeAgain

- Randall Hicks Excellence in Homeless Services Award: Georgi Fisher, Virginia Supportive Housing

- Zero: 2016 Leadership Award: Celie Weaver, Virginia Supportive Housing

- Innovation in Homeless Services: Greater Richmond Regional Domestic Violence Hotline

- Community Champion Award: Darcy Oman, The Community Foundation

Norm Suchar, Director of HUD’s Office of Special Needs Assistance Programs, will be keynoting the 2015 conference and will highlight strategic initiatives ending homelessness in communities across the country. Conference themes include building partnerships between workforce development and homeless services, developing standardized processes to more quickly and effectively respond to immediate housing crises, and securing affordable housing resources.

Homeward, a 501(c)3 collective impact nonprofit founded in 1998, works to end homelessness through data collection and trend analysis, building and sustaining collaborative partnerships, and building the capacity of our regional homeless service system to effectively serve clients so that homelessness becomes rare, brief, and non-recurring in our community. To learn more about Homeward visit www.homewardva.org.



Group at MealWHEN/WHERE:
Thursday, January 29, 2015 – 10 a.m. to 1 p.m.
St. Paul’s Episcopal Church
815 East Grace Street
Richmond, VA 23219

BACKGROUND:
Homeward, the Greater Richmond region’s planning and coordinating agency for homeless services, will conduct the winter 2015 Point-in-Time (PIT) Count of those experiencing homelessness on Thursday, January 29th. Around 300 homeless residents are anticipated at the central event site at St. Paul’s Episcopal Church, where a small resource fair will provide haircuts, clothing, and other services for participants. Additional data will be collected in Chesterfield, Hanover, and Henrico counties by mobile teams from Homeward, area police, and social service agencies looking for unsheltered individuals.

New ClaySupport the renovation and expansion of Virginia Supportive Housing​'s New Clay House! They're planning to make a $12M investment in Richmond's Carver neighborhood by renovating and expanding New Clay House and need City Council's approval for an amendment to the special use permit for the expansion. Please attend the City Council meeting on Monday, Feb. 23 at 5:45 p.m. at City Hall to show your support!

The following is a letter to City Council in support of the expansion:

On behalf of Homeward, I am writing to advocate for the approval of a special use permit for Virginia Supportive Housing to renovate and expand their New Clay facility. Our city will not continue to rise by pushing out our most vulnerable, but by developing inclusive communities that accommodate high-quality permanent housing opportunities in centrally located and promising neighborhoods such as Carver.

Greater Richmond’s homeless services system works hard to coordinate service delivery and enhance outcomes towards ending homelessness and building a stronger community. Stable housing, like that provided in New Clay, provides opportunity and hope for our most vulnerable residents. We are proud to have seen a 28.9% decrease in homelessness since 2009. In the past year alone, we have seen an 11.7% decrease in veteran homelessness and an 18.5% decrease in child homelessness. These successes are largely due to strategic partnerships with strong organizations like Virginia Supportive Housing.

Homeward and the Greater Richmond region have accepted the 100 day challenge to house 110 homeless veterans. While we know this is possible, we also know that it will take a lot of work. One of the first steps is outreach: making sure we are connecting with homeless veterans in our community.

What is outreach? Outreach is providing services to populations that might otherwise lack access. “Outreach is anytime a person engages with someone else when you’re not sitting behind a desk. I am making myself accessible for folks to engage with me,” says Crystal Rivera, Housing Transition Outreach Coordinator at the Daily Planet.

Subcategories

 

Yes, we can end homelessness

 

 

Donate

Homeward

Contact Us:

1125 Commerce Rd,
Richmond, VA 23224

Tel: (804) 343-2045
This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

Stay Informed

Facebook Twitter Youtube Linked In

Get Our Newsletter